Sauna - Health Benefits
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10 Real Sauna Benefits That Sound Totally Made Up
  • Decrease In All Cause Mortality by 40%
  • Improve endurance by 32%…

What Is A Sauna & How's It Different From A Hot Car Or Exercising In Hot Weather?

I’m trying to pin down what’s special about saunas for therapeutic usage …


We rounded up a variety of home saunas—wood-fired, infrared, portable and more—coming in at price points starting at around $100 and running up to several thousand. Read on to find your perfect home sauna match…


Sauna use not only provides immediate muscle and joint pain relief, but can also improve circulation and reduce blood pressure, which may ultimately decrease your risk of cardiovascular disease in the long term. …


Do your due diligence. In the meantime, the following are our top picks for the best home saunas, selected to offer a variety of styles. Enjoy!..


A sauna has the potential to provide you with tons of health benefits. The exposure to heat, bursts of humidity, and slow, measured breathing is an experience that relaxes and rejuvenates both your body and your mind. But if you don’t know how to sauna like a pro, you may be walking away from the de…


A typical sauna session will be set at a temperature maximum of 190 - 195 degrees Fahrenheit. For a hot yoga session inside your sauna, the recommended temperature is much lower, around 105 degrees F. If you have an electric or infrared sauna, it will be easy to set the temperature of your sauna to …


Well, it’s time to talk about the benefits of a sauna today and show that saunas are indeed “good for you.”…


Researchers from the University of Eastern Finland tracked 2,300 middle-aged men for an average of 20 years. …


Dr. Raison and his colleagues have demonstrated some promising evidence that a technique called whole-body hyperthermia has the potential for real-world clinical efficacy as a tool in the fight against major depression. …


We aimed to investigate whether frequency of sauna bathing is associated with the levels of serum C-reactive protein. C-reactive protein is a leading blood marker of systemic inflammation. …


Dr. Rhonda Patrick discusses how conditioning the body to heat stress through sauna use, called “hyperthermic conditioning” may cause adaptations that increase athletic endurance (by increasing plasma volume and blood flow to heart and muscles) and potentially even muscle mass. …



Whole-body hyperthermia is a therapeutic strategy used to treat a variety of medical conditions, including depression. Although whole-body hyperthermia and sauna use share some similarities, whole-body hyperthermia sessions are typically longer (an hour or more) and the participant’s head is spared …


Evidence indicates that sauna use reduces the risk of developing pneumonia, possibly due to its ability to increase immune cells and heat shock proteins. Heat shock proteins activate the innate immune system and inhibit influenza viral replication. …


Recreational sauna use also induces hyperthermia, but critical differences separate the two practices. Typically, traditional sauna sessions are shorter (about 15 to 20 minutes, on average) and might be interspersed with periods of cooling. …


High blood pressure is a robust predictor of future incidence of stroke, coronary heart disease, heart attack, heart failure, and cardiovascular-related death. Men who report using the sauna regularly tend to have lower blood pressure. …



The Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, an ongoing prospective population-based cohort study of health outcomes in more than 2,300 middle-aged men from eastern Finland, identified strong, dose-dependent links between sauna use and reduced death and disease. …


Several studies have shown that frequent sauna bathing (4-7 times per week, 174°F for 20 min.) is associated with a 50% lower risk for fatal heart disease, 60% lower risk for sudden cardiac death, 51% lower risk for stroke, and 46% lower risk for hypertension. …


Sauna - Health Benefits
!sauna

    Bathing oneself in heat for the purposes of purification, cleansing, and healing is an ancient practice, dating back thousands of years across many cultures. Variations of its use are seen today in the banyas of Russia, the hararas of Turkey, the sweat lodges of the American Indians, and, most famously, the saunas of Finland.

    Sauna use, sometimes referred to as “sauna bathing,” is characterized by passive exposure to extreme heat. This exposure elicits mild hyperthermia – an increase in the body’s core temperature – that induces a thermoregulatory response involving hormonal, cardiovascular, and cytoprotective mechanisms that work together to restore homeostasis and condition the body for future stressors. In recent decades, sauna use has emerged as a means to increase lifespan and improve overall health.

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